Montreal National Historic District

© Photographed June 19, 2015
Montreal, Iron County, Wisconsin
46.429081, -90.238845

Montreal National Historic District is located in Montreal, Wisconsin.

Historic American Landscapes Survey: Montreal Company Location Historic District: Written Historical and Descriptive Data
Location: Montreal, Iron County, Wisconsin

Significance:
The district has been termed a nationally significant example of industrial community planning. It is part of the Gogebic Iron Range, one of five iron ore districts that comprise the Lake Superior mining region. Montreal's residences reflect the progression of housing policies that were implemented from the mid-1800s onwards, whereas the landscape recommendations of the town planner and landscape architect Albert D. Taylor were commissioned by the Oglebay-Norton Minint Company in 1924.
History:
The historic district contains just under 150 structures, and comprises three interrelated areas: a company "location" (company houses and community buildings), the remnants of a few industrial buildings, and the three-acre Calvi Reserve. The Reserve, which included a store and some homes when it emerged during the late 19th century, was independent of any mining company sponsorship. In 1907 the first townsite, organized in a traditional rectangular pattern, was platted by the Oglebay-Norton Mining Co. During the early 1920's, the company hired landscape architect Albert Taylor to design a new addition with gently curvilinear streets that conformed to the terrain. Only a portion of Taylor's addition was carried out, but the original townsite was improved by following his extensive landscape recommendations -- especially the addition of trees, shrubs, and flowers -- all of which were implemented by the mining company. The sizes and styles of the modest vernacular houses still reveal the former differentiation within the workforce hierarchy, but most of the industrial buildings once situated by the mine shafts are either in very poor condition or have been torn down.

The Gogebic Range, which shipped its first iron ore in 1884, was an important source of high-grade ore with low phosphorus content: by 1920, Oglebay-Norton was the foremost producer in the area. To improve living conditions for immigrant miners, the company hired Albert Taylor who designed an addition to the original town, and included nurseries that provided plants from the community. The mine continued in production until 1962, after which time the homes were sold by the company.
The foregoing content of the National Park Service: American National Landscapes Survey (HALS) is in the public domain.

See also, WRL-77: The City of Montreal: Site of the World's Deepest Iron Mine, a related marker within the Montreal National Historic District.





The discovery of iron ore in 1885 triggered the founding of Montreal. The Montreal Mining Company, a subsidiary of the Cleveland corporation Oglebay, Norton and Company, developed the location. The site in the Gogebic Iron Range -- a narrow band of hills stretching across the Wisconsin-Michigan border -- became a major supplier of iron ore for the country's expanding industries. Montreal grew from a small supplier of iron ore for the country's expanding industries. Montreal grew from a small, scattered mine settlement to a community called, "the most successful environment for any of the locations found in the Lake Superior mining region."

Some of the miners (above and below) from the Montreal mines
(used with permission of Iron County Historical Society)




I have a total crush on this guy!!!

Lunchtime in the mine shaft.

See also, WRL-77: The City of Montreal: Site of the World's Deepest Iron Mine,
a related marker within the Montreal National Historic District.
The Montreal National Historic District is located in historic Montreal, Wisconsin.

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